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Benefits of Neutering Male Cats

The behavioral or medical problems caused by testosterone are common. Veterinarians deal with them on a daily basis. We do not want to see your pet suffer from a medical or behavioral problem that could have been prevented through neutering. Do your pet and yourself a good deed – by neutering your pet.

1. Decreased Aggression: Intact male cats tend to get into fights with one another in order to defend their territory and maximize their opportunities to mate with females when they come into heat.

2. Reduced Injuries: Cat fights can lead to serious scratch and bite wounds, which often become infected and turn into nasty pus-filled abscesses. Castration is reportedly about 80 - 90% effective in reducing aggression and preventing fights among male cats.

3. Neutered cats lose their strong territorial instincts, which reduces their marking behavior and makes them more loving, reliable pets.

4. Decreased Roaming: Unneutered cats tend to roam great distances in search of females to breed, returning home only to eat and sleep. Roaming increases a male cat’s chances of being hit by a car or fighting with other animals. Castration greatly reduces a cat’s risk of roaming.

5. Neutering also helps prevent androgen-related diseases, such as perianal adenomas, perineal hernias and prostate cancer.

6. Decreased Spraying: Intact males mark their territory by spraying their strong-smelling urine on objects such as draperies, furniture, carpeting and walls. Apart from being unsanitary, the urine stains and odor are extremely difficult to remove from a home. Neutering a male cat almost always stops their spraying behavior.

7. Decreased Alergic Reaction: Neutered males produce a lower level of allergens than unaltered males. Specifically, Neutered males produce Fel d 1 in levels similar to females (both intact and spayed females produce Fel d 1 in similar levels). Fel d 1 is a protein produced in cat saliva and sebaceous glands, and is the primary allergen present on cats and kittens. Click here to read more.

8. Intact males tend to be poor self-groomers, which causes them to develop hair mats and become rather scruffy-looking. On the other hand, neutered males generally pay more attention to their personal hygiene.

9. Neutering does not make male cats fat and lazy, nor does it change their personalities.

10. Contrary to previously touted theories, castration is no longer thought to be a significant contributing factor in urinary tract problems in male cats, such as Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD).

11. Tomcats that are allowed to mate at will contribute to the existing and rapidly rising pet over-population situation in North America and elsewhere. Unwanted cats overburden humane societies and animal shelters, which may ultimately need to euthanize those animals if no good homes for them can be found.

12. Improved Genetics: We want breeding animals to be the best representatives of their species. The selection is best done by professional breeders. We certainly do not want unwanted traits like hereditary diseases or aggressive personalities passed on.

13. Many animal shelters and veterinarians are starting to neuter male animals at a younger age, even 6-14 weeks of age. This early neutering does not affect the growth rate, and there are no appreciable differences in skeletal, physical, or behavioral development between those animals neutered early than those neutered at a more traditional age. It must be remembered that younger animals may need different anesthetics and are more prone to hypothermia (lower

than normal body temperature) during surgery. As long as procedures are modified to account for these differences, early neutering is very safe. In fact, animals neutered at a younger age often have faster recoveries than those neutered when they are older.






Benefits of Spaying Female Cats

1. Spaying prevents the female from coming into heat and eliminates the problems of pregnancy, cat over-population, breast tumors, irregular heat cycles, uterine infection, false pregnancies and cystic ovaries.

2. The surgical procedure does not change the queen’s basic personality or temperament, other than maybe making her less irritable and less unpredictable.

3. She loses her instincts to mark and roam and instead can devote herself to her human family members.

4. She will be more relaxed and stable once she is free from her raging hormones.

5. Spaying does not affect a cat’s hunting instincts or playfulness, nor does it necessarily make a cat lazy and fat.

6. Spaying a queen before her first heat cycle reduces her risk of developing breast cancer by approximately 90 percent. It also eliminates her chance of developing uterine cancer or infection of the uterus, which is known as pyometra.

7. Kittens can be spayed as young as 7 or 8 weeks of age. Spaying very young kittens is becoming increasingly common, especially at humane societies and animal shelters, which are trying to combat widespread pet over-population

8. Estrus: Cats are 'spontaneous ovulators.' This means a cat will ovulate, or release the eggs from her ovaries, only if she is mated. If a female cat is in heat (she will be in heat for 3 to 16 days) and is not mated, she will come back into heat every 14 to 21 days until she is mated. Physiological and behavioral patterns press upon her to mate. Being locked in an apartment or house where this is impossible causes great anxiety and frustration (for her, and you).

9. Mammary cancer: Mammary cancer is the third most common cancer in cats. Reproductive hormones are one of the primary causes of mammary cancer in the cat. Cats who have been spayed have a 40-60% lower risk of developing mammary cancer than those who have not been spayed.

10. Tumors of the reproductive tract: Tumors also occur in the uterus and ovaries. An OHE would, of course, eliminate any possibility of this occurring. They are not commonly seen cancers in cats, but they do occur.

11. Infections of the reproductive tract: Unspayed cats may develop a severe uterine disease called pyometra. With this disorder, bacteria enter the uterus and it becomes filled with pus. The normal 6-inch long, thin horns of the uterus enlarge to 10 inches long and can become the diameter of a human thumb. Undetected, this condition is almost always fatal. In rare cases, when the condition is found early, hormonal and antibiotic therapy may be successful. This type of therapy is limited to valuable breeding animals. Generally, the treatment of pyometra requires a difficult and expensive ovariohysterectomy. The toxicities resulting from the infection

can strain the kidneys or heart, and in some cases may be fatal or cause life long problems, even after the infected uterus has been removed.

12. Behavior and hygienic problems: During the heat cycle there are numerous behavior problems that may develop. Females in heat will actively search out male cats and may attempt to escape from the house or yard, putting them in the danger of traffic, fights with other animals, etc.

13. Often there is a sudden influx of male cats around the home and yard.

14. The howling at 2 a.m. will affect your behavior as well as your cat's.

15. In addition, unspayed females may spray urine when they are heat.

16. Many animal shelters and veterinarians are starting to spay female animals at a younger age, even at 2 months. This early neutering does not affect the growth rate, and there are no appreciable differences in skeletal, physical, or behavioral development between those animals neutered early than those neutered at a more traditional age. It must be remembered that younger animals may need different anesthetics and are more prone to hypothermia (lower than normal body temperature) during surgery. As long as procedures are modified to account for these differences, early spaying is very safe. In fact, animals spayed at a younger age often have faster recoveries than those spayed when they are older.

 

Courtesy of
www.peteducation.com